Kinnear Park Ribbon Cutting

Although Kinnear Park was established before John Charles Olmsted developed the park and boulevard system for Seattle, he included it in that plan because it exemplified one type of park he wanted the city to develop - open space along bluffs that featured stunning water and mountain views and forested hillsides.

He wrote in his 1903 report: "The park is pleasing in detail and extremely valuable, owing to the fine views which it commands over the Sound. It is a good sample of the miles of similar bluff parks which it is hoped the city will eventually have. Such parks will always be a great benefit to adjoining residential property, and will occupy land which it is rather desirable than otherwise to prevent being utilized by houses, since it is too steep or too subject to landslides to be suitable for such purposes." By taking advantage of two of Seattle's features - steep hills and distant views, Kinnear Park made potential disadvantages into valuable city assets.

For the past several years volunteers from FOLKpark (Friends of Lower Kinnear Park) have worked to restore the lower, wooded portion of Kinnear Park. According to the Parks Department, "FOLKpark helped raise nearly $1 million for improvements including widened pathways, removal of many invasive plants and expanded views into the interior of the park. HBB Landscape Architecture designed the park renewal. Funding came from the Parks and Green Spaces Levy Opportunity Fund, Department of Neighborhood Matching Fund, contributions from individual and business supporters and a variety of fundraising efforts."

This Saturday, from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m., there will be activities in the park to celebrate the improvements. FOLKpark will give guided tours and there will be information tables set up by local organizations, including FSOP. Please stop by to visit us!

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Kinnear Park, 1908. Courtesy Seattle Municipal Archives, Item No. 29507

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